Annoying Clients?

in Client

It's a serious issue in any trade, but specifically a big deal in plumbing. People invite you into their home to do a specific job, and then they just won't let you alone. It's enough to make anybody go nuts, but there are ways to handle it and avoid a complete meltdown on the job.

This happens more frequently than you think. You get a job, grab your equipment, and go to the job. The client seems nice enough, but as you tidy up the job scene (sometimes moving around a considerable bit of junk, I might add) and layout your tools, you notice that something is a little bit off. The person you let in is watching your every move. The client can talk about anything to you while your working so be prepared. Or they might not be talking at all, which is sometimes even worse. You have to wonder whether doing, just hanging around.

As the job progresses, you can tell if the client is making you their own constant companion. Th clients may talk to you, fiddle around in another room an or being in the work are. They might ask you questions, either related to the job, or not. Or there might not be any time for questions, or even to get a word in, as they continue their soliloquy right in your ear as you are trying to wrestle with hot and cold water pipes.

Well, friends and neighbours, you just going to have to do the best you can. You can't pack up and leave, and most of what you might like to save your client would just provoke some kind of needless drama, but there are ways for handling this kind of possibly well-intentioned distraction.

The first thing is to get your client engaged in what's happening, not just going on about random chitchat topics. You can take the initiative and explain exactly what you're doing, and let the client ask questions. This is the MVP of your role. Remember, you're working on their house, the place that they live in everyday, and what may be the biggest investment in their life. They may have struggled with the same issues that you're dealing with at the moment, and they may have some very relevant questions about the work that you're doing. Resisting the urge to "brush off" these clients make you more of a professional resource, more of the skilled expert, and can possibly lead to a better workflow and a better client base as people realize that you're committed to explaining what you're doing, rather than just slogging through it.

Turning some of these talking situations around can be one of the best things you ever do in a plumbing job site situation. The next time a client is talking your ear off, use this solution. You'll be contributing to someone's quality of life, and using your skills to help others, and that's a good thing.

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Scott S. Rodgers has 1 articles online

Scott Rodgers is a plumber who has recently begun writing articles for both a plumbing and non-plumbing audience. To view more of plumbing articles, visit http://eLocalPlumbers.com

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This article was published on 2010/03/29